The Midnight Library, by Matt Haig

Nora Seed can’t take it anymore. Her parents are dead, her brother doesn’t talk to her, and she’s just lost her job. When a rejected suitor knocks on her door to tell her that her beloved cat is dead in the street, she decides that she is beyond depressed, and so she takes all of her anti-depressants at once.

The afterlife is not what she had anticipated. It’s a library, and her former school librarian is there to help her find just the right book among the infinite number of books of alternate lives. First, she has to read The Book of Regrets, which gets heavier and heavier as she reads, and then she can choose which regret she would like to reverse in order to live a better life. There are infinite choices, but if she gives up altogether, the library will be destroyed, and she will be truly dead.

Combining wishful thinking with quantum mechanics, Haig whips Nora and the reader along a painful path to wisdom. Nora’s changes do not just affect her own life, but also the people who are part of her existence, whether she knows them intimately or they are mere acquaintances. Haig explores the interconnectedness of communities and families and questions the limits of individuals’ responsibility for those around them. As Nora tries on different lives, the same character who was charming in one iteration may be loathsome in another, raising the nature/nurture debate about how much we are victims of our circumstances. Will Nora ever be happy?

I listened to this book on audio, read by Carey Mulligan, and found it to be delightful. Some reviewers complained that it was predictable, and to an extent, that is true. The theory of quantum physics has spawned a thousand works of fiction exploring alternate lives, but Nora is a believable, very ordinary character, and the reader will find herself cheering for some of her choices and backpedaling from others. Truthfully, I did not predict the ending, and I was really hoping for another. However, Haig’s conclusion was much more satisfying than mine would have been.

Fun stories with a side of thoughtfulness. Recommended.

Disclaimer: I listened to a library audiobook of this title. Opinions expressed are solely my own and may not reflect those of my employer or anyone else.

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