Tag Archives: Susan Wiggs

The Lost and Found Bookshop, by Susan Wiggs

Lost and Found BookshopNatalie had just received a big promotion in her tech career, working for a winemaker in Napa Valley. She had it all, a great job in an idyllic location, plus a wonderful man who loved her. Her life was just what she had planned: stable and secure. She was determined that she would not live like her mother, the owner of a bookstore who had never married and was often uncertain that she could pay the bills each month. Why, then, did her mother seem so happy, while Natalie knew that something was missing?

In an instant, Natalie’s life changed when her mother died and left her the bookshop in a coveted antique building in San Francisco. Before Natalie could put it on the market, she found out that the building still belonged to her beloved grandfather, who was struggling with dementia and declining health. Grandy was sure that the family legend was true: that there was treasure hidden somewhere in the building—the building that, unfortunately, was falling apart and needed repairs that they could not afford. Natalie had had no idea that her mother was so deeply in debt.

Some emergency repairs must be done, of course, and Natalie’s mother had already engaged the services of Peach Gallagher, who showed up with his tool belt on the morning that Natalie’s car was towed away. She was standing on the sidewalk, fresh out of bed and crying. He thought she was a homeless woman, she thought he was married, and you know where this is going.

My colleague, Emily, had mentioned this book, and since I had been doing so much serious reading and the Coronavirus isolation was dragging me down, I thought a sweet, light read would do me good. The book starts with a funeral, then goes on to so many disasters and unsolvable problems that I thought I had misunderstood. What are all those lovely, colorful books doing on the front cover? Is this false advertising?

No one can stay down for long when your handyman is named Peach, especially when the “hammer for hire” is also gorgeous and surprisingly erudite. Heroes in romances for bookish women must be well-read, and Peach fills the bill. Add in his charming daughter, the two dedicated bookstore employees, her darling grandfather, and a swoonworthy, famous children’s author, and you have a book-loving reader’s dream. Lots of authors and titles thrown around, quotes from famous works, and the bookstore culture of espresso and cats. I also enjoyed reminiscing about San Francisco and thinking “I’ve been there!” when place names and landmarks were mentioned.

The Lost and Found Bookshop is the place to go for bookish readers who need a lift. Delightful Up Lit, all the feels.

Disclaimer: I read a library electronic copy of this book. Opinions expressed are solely my own and may not reflect those of my employer or anyone else.

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